THE HEART BEAT: What motivates us to serve in Papua, Indonesia?

It is hard to believe that six years have passed. Six years since our family of six, adventurously, stepped onto a metal tube and hurled thousands of miles across oceans and seas, from America to Papua. Our lives would never be the same again. Nor hopefully naive about. One of Darron’s latest discoveries was the importance of a church wedding verses an outdoor wedding. How it is a statement of purity verses impurity. We had to chuckle that all the photos of our wedding, in our living room, are taken outside those around us. Now six years later, our two oldest son’s transitioned this May ’17 to full time State side living, while now the four of us, continue on.

Every day, life here is an adventure. The longer we are here, the deeper the adventure and knowledge. Especially into the social and cultural aspects that we were and still are so naive about. One of Darron’s latest discoveries was the importance of a church wedding verses an outdoor wedding. How it is a statement of purity verses impurity. We had to chuckle that all the photos of our wedding, in our living room, are taken outside, after the ceremony. So no wonder when guests arrive they don’t seem at ease until we mention that we were married inside a church. Culture is a funny thing and we cannot over-estimate the power and voice it gives to EVERYTHING.

Just last month, eight new young adults arrived, to spend a year interior, serving in remote locations. They have been through a two-month training program and are so eager. We are working hard to try and keep these young people supported and taken care of. Just this week we were busy making medical packets filled with special medicines and instructions in case they get sick while interior. This is something we have known that we have needed to do for several years. Sometimes it takes a long time to put ideas into actual implementation. I’m sure you can relate???! It feels so good when we do accomplish these goals. Also now, every afternoon Darron’s secretary checks in by short wave radio with as many of the missionaries as possible. Erin is faithfully relaying messages, noting needed supplies or missionaries that are sick and have specific needs.

Cindy, is serving in the school in Hobotongo (a very far mountainous region). There over 80-90 children that come over crazy terrain to be educated. This is the only school in a vast mount valley area serving over 11-12,000 people. Last month, Cindy had to be medevac’d due to Typhoid. Typhoid is a nasty tropical illness that leaves one very weak, usually with a high fever and a very disagreeable tummy. It can be easily treated with antibiotics once diagnosed, but usually takes several weeks to recover from. She came into Darron’s office shortly after starting the treatment and he noting how weak she looked. Spontaneously he felt compelled to give her a pin that was handed out at the GC session, for mission service. He told her, “Any missionary that can survive Typhoid in Hobotongo, deserves a pin”. She was teary with his acknowledgement. A simple pin. Encouraged one greatly. This is the heart beat of why Darron and I still feel called to Papua. We know that we are here to encourage, support, and fan the flame under these young people.

So many of you tell us you are praying for us. We are so grateful. Satan is not happy that we are here and he throws many “spears” at us and our co-workers (Gary and Wendy Roberts), trying to discourage us. We are committed. We are seeking God’s will and we are assured that we are right where He wants us to be.

We would love to hear from you and pray for you too. Email, anytime. [email protected]

Our blogs are: pastordarronboyd.blogspot.com and iwillgoruth.blogspot.com

sydney.adventist.org.au

by Darron Boyd